When you gotta lotta burrata… make cheesy salads

…and write even cheesier blog post titles!

Burrata Salad with Strawberries, Radicchio and Nasturtium Leaves

Burrata Salad with Strawberries, Radicchio and Nasturtium Leaves

I can only stop thinking about food for so long — so I’m taking a break from posting about Alaska to show you some of the fabulous things I ate before I left Portland.

A week before my flight back home, my husband decided to make me dinner. It was a wonderfully delicious meal, starting with a salad of cherries, radicchio and burrata cheese. The salad was dressed simply in a combination of Agrumato extra virgin lemon olive oil and some aged balsamic vinegar I bought in Modena, Italy years ago. The bottle isn’t looking so pretty but I promise you, the vinegar inside is like candy.

This was the only major purchase I made on this trip -- I was about 23 years old and saved $100 for the bottle.

This was the only major purchase I made on my third trip to Italy — I was about 23 years old, fresh out of culinary school and saved $100 for the bottle. Twelve years later, it’s still delicious!

I only took one picture of the original salad because I was too focused on stuffing it into my mouth as quickly as possible — you can see it by clicking here. I was so in love with it that I kept making different versions of it throughout the week. By the time I left, the tub of burrata was empty.

In case you are unfamiliar, burrata is an Italian cheese made from mozzarella and cream. The outside of the cheese ball (for lack of a better word) is a stiff mozzarella while the inside is a dreamy mixture of cheese and cream that is soft and oozy. The cheese is mild in flavor so make sure to season it well with good olive oil and plenty of fleur de sel.

My first rendition of my husband’s salad used radicchio, perfectly ripe white nectarines, cherries and basil. It was so colorful and pretty.

Burrata cheese, nectarines, cherries and basil

I added a drizzle of the balsamic and some good crunchy sea salt and it was a delightful summer meal.

Aged balsamic with burrata cheese

Burrata cheese, nectarines, cherries and basil

Nothing beats the combination of fruit with aged balsamic vinegar. So happy!

Burrata cheese, nectarines, cherries and basil

Burrata cheese, nectarines, cherries and basil

A peek inside a burrata ball.

The next time I made it, I went even more simple: radicchio, burrata and strawberries and nasturtiums from my garden. I kept the dressing the same with olive oil, balsamic and salt.

Burrata Salad with Strawberries

Burrata Salad with Strawberries

Pure bliss, people. Really.

I’m off to buy restock my burrata supply — what is your favorite way to enjoy this creamy delicious cheese? Give me some new inspiration!

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9 thoughts on “When you gotta lotta burrata… make cheesy salads

    • It is soooo good! It’s like the happiest creamiest cheese ever. My husband apparently knows how to make it so maybe I need to have him teach me and I’ll do a tutorial. Then, if you can’t find it, you can always DIY. =)

  1. Beautiful salads! I love summer salads like these, simple and packed with flavor. You’ve had that bottle 12 years?! I don’t think I can keep anything in my pantry that long because I tend to use everything as fast as I can. The aged balsamic sounds wonderful on these salads!

    • I know! It’s kind of crazy it’s been around so long. I was really careful not to use much of it when I first got it. I treated it like it was made of gold. Now since it’s made it this long, I’ve gotten more liberal with it. We put it on everything, and yes, it’s great on these salads. And once it’s gone, it means I get to go back to Italy to get another bottle, right?!

  2. Oh burrata, how I love thee! 🙂 The first time I ever tried it was in a salad. It was served over a bed of arugula with some pickled red onion, a little salt and pepper and a drizzle of olive oil. Pure and simple perfection.

    I also tried a Pinterest recipe: tomato, peach, and burrata salad. I took it to a summer BBQ and it was a big hit!

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